February 19, 2010

Friday Favorite: Chiropractic for Asthma


As asthma becomes more prevalent so does the use of asthma drugs. Unfortunately, these medications don’t come without a cost both physically and financially. Many asthma medications seem to reduce asthma at first, but ultimately mask the underlying problem while potentially causing life threatening conditions.

Due to safety concerns, as of February 18, 2010, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is requiring changes in four of the major asthma medications; Advair, Serevent, Foradil and Symbicort because of their potential life threatening side effects.

It is estimated that 22 million Americans have asthma, and more than 6 million Americans use one of the four medications mentioned above.
  
There are many other types of treatment for asthma that don’t have the risk of life threatening side effects. Chiropractic is a natural treatment that has been shown time and time again to help relieve and prevent asthma in many patients.

The stress from our daily lives puts excess stress on our bodies and our nervous systems. Chiropractic helps to reduce the stress on our bodies, reducing inflammation and increasing joint motion. Proper joint motion in the mid back is especially important for people with asthma as it increases rib motion, allowing more oxygen to be inhaled. With all joints moving and inflammation reduced as much as possible, our nervous systems can function properly which is essential for true health.

“I used to take Advair daily to control my asthma, but after one adjustment, I wouldn’t need to take Advair for at least a month,” Jordan, 22, chiropractic patient, said. “Ever since I have been getting adjusted regularly, I haven’t needed to take Advair or any other type of asthma medication.”
 
Elimination of dairy and inflammatory processed food has also been shown to greatly reduce asthma symptoms.

Consider chiropractic or other types of natural treatment for asthma, to avoid the risk of potential life threatening side effects, especially with children.

2 comments:

  1. A relevant but strangely ignored or not generally known fact about asthma and breathing troubles is that the change between weak (asthmatic) and strong (healthy) breathing is dependent on abdominal muscle tension. Slackening the muscles here causes abysmally weak and asthmatic breathing. Instead of describing an asthma attack as being like breathing through a straw (57,00 Google hits), attempting to breathe vigorously with relaxed abdominal muscles provides a more genuine illustrative example. Training the muscles, for example by “abdominal hollowing” (see Web articles) produces an antiasthmatic effect. Abdominal muscle tension plays a prominent part in Asian martial arts.

    So it is fair to assume that there is a natural breathing spectrum with an asthmatic tendency at one end and Ku Fu or Karate breathing at the other end. For a few words on the Japanese version of Asian breathing see http://www.lrz.de/~s3e0101/webserver/webdata/OBT.pdf

    I personally tend to breathe asthmatically after an evening meal or in pollen-laden air. Breathing powerfully into my lower abdomen with tensed muscles provides an effective cure for me. But then I’ve always been sceptical about medical wisdom on asthma: such a paradoxical and doctor-baffling increase in the last 40 years with modern, merely symptomatic inhalers. Respectfully, Richard Friedel

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  2. Nice blog...............thank you for post it...

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